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Posts Tagged ‘Lucid Lynx

A simple way to enable .py Python CGI scripts on Lighttpd (“Lighty”) webserver on Ubuntu

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After multiple, failed, attempts with mod_fastcgi I found a simple three step solution to enable python scripts on my webserver:

  1. sudo ln -s /etc/lighttpd/conf-available/10-cgi.conf /etc/lighttpd/conf-enabled/
  2. Add the following section to your /etc/lighttpd/lighttpd.conf file:
    ### Python Config ###
    cgi.assign = (

    “.py” => “/usr/bin/python”
    )
  3. Restart lighty: sudo /etc/init.d/lighttpd restart


That should do the trick. As it says in the title, this is a simple and painless way to enable Python CGI scripts on lighty.

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Written by eubolist

2010/06/13 at 15:06

Howto: Create a bootable Linux USB flash drive (USB-stick) in Mac OSX

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For Windows and Linux there’s UNetbootin, in OSX you have to rely on the terminal to create your USB flash drive.

Step 1: Download the image of the distro you want to use. In my case XUbuntu 10.04.

Step2: If there is data that you still need on your flash drive, save it on your desktop or somewhere else on your harddrive. I created a folder ‘Data’ on my desktop.

Step3: Open a terminal and type in mount . This should give you a list of mounted drives on your Mac, like this:

eubolists-macbook-pro:~ eubolist$ mount
/dev/disk0s2 on / (hfs, local, journaled)
devfs on /dev (devfs, local, nobrowse)
map -hosts on /net (autofs, nosuid, automounted, nobrowse)
map auto_home on /home (autofs, automounted, nobrowse)
/dev/disk0s3 on /Volumes/BOOTCAMP (fusefs, local, synchronous)
/dev/disk1s2 on /Volumes/Time Machine-Backups (hfs, local, nodev, nosuid, journaled)
/dev/disk3 on /Volumes/8GB DRIVE (msdos, local, nodev, nosuid, noowners) <– This is the one we want
Step 4: Unmount the drive: diskutil umountDisk /dev/disk3 Of course you may have to change disk3 to whatever disk your flash drive is.
Step 5: Write the image: dd if=/Users/eubolist/Downloads/xubuntu-10.04-desktop-i386.iso of=/dev/disk3 bs=1m
Again, change the command as needed. The path to your image is in all probability different as well as the path to your flash drive.
Now you should see the light of your flash drive flashing and after a while an output that looks similar like the following:

681+1 records in
681+1 records out
714168320 bytes transferred in 225.925632 secs (3161077 bytes/sec)

If that’s the case, congrats! You should have a bootable flash drive now. If you want to, you can create another partition if you have enough space and put the data saved earlier in Step 2 back on your usb drive now.
NOTE: If you have an older PC it might still not boot from your flash drive, even if you did everything well. Some older BIOSes just don’t support booting from USB flash drives.

Written by eubolist

2010/05/24 at 19:42

Ubuntu Lucid Lynx 10.04 LTS is out!!

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Download the newest Ubuntu long term support (LTS) release on http://releases.ubuntu.com/releases/10.04/. If possible choose a torrent download to save Canonical some server bandwidth and you some time.

Tests about the new Ubuntu will be on my blog soon!

Written by eubolist

2010/04/30 at 22:18

Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx) Beta 2 released

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Ubuntu 10.04 Beta 2 Has just been released. Why don’t you head over to http://releases.ubuntu.com/10.04/ and download a copy?

If you want to upgrade your existing Ubuntu installation to the newest Beta version type “gksu update-manager -d” in a terminal.

Written by eubolist

2010/04/08 at 15:01

Howto: Ubuntu Lucid Lynx Beta 1 Encrypt System Partition using Live CD

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In case the alternate installation doesn’t work for you (there have been some bugs reported in the current Beta 1 version) or you only downloaded the Desktop CD and now suddenly decided to install Ubuntu on an encrypted partition, this is the right guide for you. If you just like pretty GUIs that’s okay too, but be aware that for this tutorial you should be comfortable working from the terminal. (though most of this tutorial you can just copy – paste into a terminal window).

Let’s start by installing lvm2 on your live system (the desktop cd doesn’t have that by default), open a terminal and type:

sudo su

aptitude update && aptitude install lvm2

If that fails check your network connection. You need a working internet connection to download the package. Now you need to set up (at least) two partitions:

  • /dev/sda1: an unencrypted /boot partition (around 250 MB) and
  • /dev/sda2: one encrypted LVM volume for your / filesystem and swap.

In your system it may be /dev/sdb or whatever you choose: Adjust the following commands to your system configuration:

cryptsetup -c aes-xts-plain -s 512 luksFormat /dev/sda2

When choosing a password take a long, safe password which is not prone to dictionary or brute force attacks. But also make sure you won’t forget it – if you forget your password all your files and settings will be lost.

cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda2 lvm

pvcreate /dev/mapper/lvm

vgcreate ubuntu /dev/mapper/lvm

lvcreate -L 1300M -n swap ubuntu

You can change the size of the swap partition, usually a value 1.3-1.5x your RAM size is fine.

lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n root ubuntu

If you want more than one partition (eg. a seperate /home partition) don’t use 100%FREE but the value you wish and define the additional partitions using the above scheme before proceeding to the next step.

mkswap /dev/mapper/ubuntu-swap

mkfs.ext4 /dev/mapper/ubuntu-root

Now start the installation process (don’t close the terminal yet, we’ll need it later). In the partitioning step choose /dev/mapper/ubuntu-root -> Mount point: / and reformat the partition with ext4. Choose /dev/sda1 -> Mount point: /boot and also reformat the partition.

Then continue your installation. On my system it wasn’t able to install the bootloader – don’t worry, we’ll fix that later, just continue with the installation. Once it’s finished don’t restart the system: Close the window and go to the terminal again.

mount /dev/mapper/ubuntu-root /mnt
mount /dev/sdX1 /mnt/boot
mount -o rbind /dev /mnt/dev
mount -t proc proc /mnt/proc
mount -t sysfs sys /mnt/sys
chroot /mnt

Now you’re chrooted in your new installation and able to modify it in order to boot into the encrypted partition. Install the necessary software:

aptitude install cryptsetup lvm2

Then you need to write the UUID of the encrypted partition into /etc/crypttab

echo “lvm UUID=VOLUME_ID none luks” >> /etc/crypttab

You can find out the volume id by typing blkid /dev/sda2 in your terminal. Lastly you need to update the initramfs with

update-initramfs -u -k all

If you were able to install the bootloader grub during the installation process you’re done now, you can exit the terminal and reboot. If not there are three more commands you need to run before exiting:

aptitude install grub2

grub-install /dev/sda

update-grub

If all went well you have a 10.04 installation with an encrypted system drive now. Congratulations!

NOTE: The last part of this tutorial (chrooting plus installing grub) may also serve as a workaround if you encounter any problems or bugs setting up grub during the regular installation process.

Written by eubolist

2010/04/05 at 18:51

Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx: Dual Screen with nVidia GeForce MX 460 and nvidia-glx-96 legacy driver

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Uprgrading to Lucid Lynx Alpha 2 somehow messed with my dual screen configuration, here is what you have to do to reconfigure it again:

1. Install the proprietary driver: sudo aptitude install nvidia-glx-96

2. Backup your xorg.conf file sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.backup

3. Change your xorg.conf file to the following (sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf):

Section “ServerLayout”
Identifier     “Layout0”
Screen      0  “Screen0”
InputDevice    “Keyboard0” “CoreKeyboard”
InputDevice    “Mouse0” “CorePointer”
EndSection

Section “Files”
EndSection

Section “InputDevice”
# generated from default
Identifier     “Mouse0”
Driver         “mouse”
Option         “Protocol” “auto”
Option         “Device” “/dev/psaux”
Option         “Emulate3Buttons” “no”
Option         “ZAxisMapping” “4 5”
EndSection

Section “InputDevice”
# generated from default
Identifier     “Keyboard0”
Driver         “kbd”
EndSection

Section “Monitor”
Identifier     “Monitor0”
VendorName     “Unknown”
ModelName      “Unknown”
Option         “Twinview” “True”
Option         “TwinviewOrientation” “RightOf”
Option         “UseEdidFreqs” “True”
HorizSync       30.0 – 110.0
#    VertRefresh     50.0 – 150.0
VertRefresh     60.0
Option         “DPMS”
EndSection

Section “Device”
Identifier     “nVidia Corporation NV17 [GeForce4 MX 460]”
Driver         “nvidia”
VendorName     “NVIDIA Corporation”
EndSection

Section “Screen”
Identifier     “Screen0”
Device         “Device0”
Monitor        “Monitor0”
DefaultDepth    24
SubSection     “Display”
Depth       24
Modes      “1280×1024” “1024×768”
EndSubSection
EndSection

You might need to play around a little with the options (such as the resolution). My advice is to use a second computer (preferably a laptop) and ssh into the first computer that you want to configure. That way you can comfortably comment out or add single lines to your xorg.conf even if you don’t have a visual picture.

If everything fails just revert back to the default xorg.conf with either one of the following commands:

sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf.backup /etc/X11/xorg.conf

or

sudo dpkg –reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg


Howto: PPTP VPN Server with Ubuntu 10.04 ‘Lucid Lynx’

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This tutorial describes how you set up a computer as a dedicated VPN server for your network. With a VPN server you can open secure data tunnels and access files and deivces in your local network (eg. home or office) from remote locations, which is not only a pretty cool thing (accessing your media library from anywhere) but also very handy for system maintenance or customer support or if you want to work from home.

VPN scheme

A simple scheme how VPN works: Through your VPN server you will have full, secure access to your LAN (source: caconsultant.com)


Note that Lucid Lynx is still in Alpha 2 stage at the time of writing this article, this means you should only use it for testing purposes. Although the server I’ve set up writing this tutorial has been running without any kind of problems for two weeks now I recommend if you want to set up a Ubuntu server in a working environment you to go back to 9.10 ‘Karmic Koala’ or even an earlier stable version. Okay, this being said
let’s get started:

1. Download the Lucid Lynx Alpha 2 server CD image from this page: http://releases.ubuntu.com/releases/10.04/

2. Follow the installation wizard and install the core system

3. Under software selection select OpenSSH server – for remote management of the machine – and manual package selection for the actual pptpd package. If you want more services, for example if you want to use the computer also as a webserver, you may of course select the additional software. For security reasons I generally advise people to only run one from the outside accessible service per machine if set up in a critical environment, but really that’s up to you.

Lucid server install, software selection

Software selection

4. In manual selection navigate to ‘not installed packages’ -> ‘net’ where you will find pptpd. Select it and press ‘g’ twice in order to install the package.

Lucid server install package selection

Package selction --> PPTPd

5. Let the installation finish and reboot your system.

6. SSH into your newly set up machine and run ‘sudo aptitude update && sudo aptitude safe-upgrade’ first to update all packages. Reboot if necessary.

7. Open the pptpd.conf file: ‘sudo nano /etc/pptpd.conf‘ Adjust the IP settings at the bottom to your needs. Under local IP you enter the IP in the local network of your VPN server (if you don’t know it type ‘sudo ifconfig’ and it will show you your network interfaces and the assigned IPs). For that matter I recommend to set up a static IP in /etc/network/interfaces or in your router configuration.

8. If you want to, you can change the hostname in /etc/ppp/pptpd-options

9. Specify the user names and passwords you want to give access to your vpn: ‘sudo nano /etc/ppp/chap-secrets‘. If you changed the hostname in the step before make sure you type in the same hostname now under ‘server’

Example:

# client server secret IP addresses
eubolist pptpd myübersecretpassword *

As in pptp there is no keyfile security depends solely on the password. Which is why you should choose a long (eg. 32 characters), random password. You can generate such a password here.

10. Now we need to set up ip-masquerading: ‘sudo nano /etc/rc.local

Add the following lines above the line that says ‘exit 0

# PPTP IP forwarding

iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE

Optionally I recommend securing your SSH server against brute force attacks:

# SSH Brute Force Protection

iptables -A INPUT -i eth0 -p tcp –dport 22 -m state –state NEW -m recent –set –name SSH
iptables -A INPUT -i eth0 -p tcp –dport 22 -m state –state NEW -m recent –update –seconds 60 –hitcount 8 –rttl –name SSH -j DROP

(also to be inserted above ‘exit 0’)

You may have to change ‘eth 0’ to another interface, depending on which interface is configured to connect to the internet on your machine.

11. Lastly, uncomment this line in /etc/sysctl.conf:

net.ipv4.ip_forward=1

12. Reboot

13. In case your vpn-server doesn’t directly connect to the internet you may need to forward port 1723 TCP and GRE to the LAN IP of your vpn-server. Refer to your router’s manual or to portforward.com for vendor specific instructions.

Done. Enjoy!

UPDATE(2010-07-18): If connecting to the vpn-server goes well but you can’t connect to the internet you might want to try uncommenting the ms-dns entries in /etc/ppp/pptpd-options so it looks like this:

ms-dns 208.67.222.222
ms-dns 208.67.220.220

Written by eubolist

2010/01/28 at 15:56