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Posts Tagged ‘osx

Howto: Create a bootable Linux USB flash drive (USB-stick) in Mac OSX

with 7 comments

For Windows and Linux there’s UNetbootin, in OSX you have to rely on the terminal to create your USB flash drive.

Step 1: Download the image of the distro you want to use. In my case XUbuntu 10.04.

Step2: If there is data that you still need on your flash drive, save it on your desktop or somewhere else on your harddrive. I created a folder ‘Data’ on my desktop.

Step3: Open a terminal and type in mount . This should give you a list of mounted drives on your Mac, like this:

eubolists-macbook-pro:~ eubolist$ mount
/dev/disk0s2 on / (hfs, local, journaled)
devfs on /dev (devfs, local, nobrowse)
map -hosts on /net (autofs, nosuid, automounted, nobrowse)
map auto_home on /home (autofs, automounted, nobrowse)
/dev/disk0s3 on /Volumes/BOOTCAMP (fusefs, local, synchronous)
/dev/disk1s2 on /Volumes/Time Machine-Backups (hfs, local, nodev, nosuid, journaled)
/dev/disk3 on /Volumes/8GB DRIVE (msdos, local, nodev, nosuid, noowners) <– This is the one we want
Step 4: Unmount the drive: diskutil umountDisk /dev/disk3 Of course you may have to change disk3 to whatever disk your flash drive is.
Step 5: Write the image: dd if=/Users/eubolist/Downloads/xubuntu-10.04-desktop-i386.iso of=/dev/disk3 bs=1m
Again, change the command as needed. The path to your image is in all probability different as well as the path to your flash drive.
Now you should see the light of your flash drive flashing and after a while an output that looks similar like the following:

681+1 records in
681+1 records out
714168320 bytes transferred in 225.925632 secs (3161077 bytes/sec)

If that’s the case, congrats! You should have a bootable flash drive now. If you want to, you can create another partition if you have enough space and put the data saved earlier in Step 2 back on your usb drive now.
NOTE: If you have an older PC it might still not boot from your flash drive, even if you did everything well. Some older BIOSes just don’t support booting from USB flash drives.
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Written by eubolist

2010/05/24 at 19:42

Anki: An Intelligent Study Card System For Any OS

with 3 comments

A month ago I was looking for a new computer-based method to improve my study schedule. After a bit of searching in the endless depth of the web I discovered Anki, a flash card application that has several very useful features:

  • It is written in Python and available for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and FreeBSD – which means it runs on virtually any computer.
  • There are a lot of  “Decks” (=sets of flashcards built by other users) already available on the web
  • The interface is really nice and intuitive, adding sound, video or pictures to your cards is very easy, thus can be accomplished by people with little experience with computers. Also there are many options to adjust the program to your study habits.
  • Anki uses spaced repetition. After each card you have to say how well you remembered it – based on that Anki will set the interval after which the card will be brought up again. With this technique facts will be pushed into your long-term memory. That means you won’t experience black outs in exams anymore as the hormone cortisol, released by your body in situations of psychological stress, only affects the short term but not the long term memory.

If that made you curious, why don’t you give it a try! Here are the download links:

Windows

Ubuntu (you can also install it with apt-get/aptitude, but the version in the repositories is pretty old)

Linux

Mac OSX

FreeBSD

Written by eubolist

2010/03/14 at 21:10